Different Kinds of Dementia have Unique Walking Patterns

According to a new study by researchers at Newcastle University in the UK, people with different kinds of dementia have their own unique walking patterns. This can provide a non-invasive less expensive way to diagnose these kinds of dementias based on their gait (walking patterns). The study was published September 20, 2019 in Alzheimer’s &…

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Mixed Dementia may be the most Common Type of Dementia

Mixed dementia also called “dementia-multifactorial” is a disease condition where more than one type of dementia occur at the same time. However, only autopsies can definitely determine which kind of dementia or combination of dementias the deceased suffered from. At present there is no real way to diagnose mixed dementia. According to the National Institute…

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A Diet High in Fish may Protect Against Asthma

A study by researchers from James Cook University in Australia found that a diet high in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) found in fish showed protection against the occurrence of asthma. On the contrary a diet high in n-6 PUFA found in vegetable oils showed an increase in the incidence of asthma. Results of…

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Lewy Body Dementia (LBD)

Lewy body dementia (LBD) is the second most common form of dementia after Alzheimer’s disease. According to the National Institute on Aging (NIA), Lewy body dementia affects more than a million people in the United States. The name Lewy body comes from Dr. Friederich Lewy, a German neurologist who discovered in 1912 the abnormal clumps…

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Depression Calls for Professional Medical Help

Depression is a very serious condition and mood disorder that should not be confused with sadness or loneliness. Everyone feels sad sometimes. A person may experience grief after the death of a spouse or other family member, but in time they get over these feelings and life goes on. Depression, however, does not usually go…

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When is Memory Loss More than Mild Forgetfulness?

  June 2019 is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month to raise awareness of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and many people are wearing purple in solidarity with AD Awareness Month. It is estimated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that over five million people are affected by Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in the United States.…

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Group Singing for Parkinson’s Disease and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

Group Singing for Parkinson’s Disease Group singing has amazingly been shown to be beneficial for people suffering from Parkinson’s disease (PD) by improving stress, mood and motor function. Research led by Elizabth Stegemöller, an assistant professor of kinesiology at Iowa State University reported the results of the therapeutic singing at the conference of the Society…

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Research Proves Listening to Music is Relaxing and Good for Health

We all like listening to music. It relaxes us and makes us feel good. Researchers from Juntendo University in Japan set out to prove scientifically that music can relax us and what effects listening to music have on the human mind and body. The results of their study were published February 2, 2018 in Scientific…

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Benefits for Seniors who Participate in the Arts

According to ongoing research by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), when seniors participate in the arts they show improvements in health, well-being and are more able to function independently. The NIA and doctors have long advocated eating a good nutritious diet, getting enough physical exercise and getting a good night’s sleep for healthy aging.…

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Dancing is Good for Seniors

Physical exercise is good for seniors and gives all kinds of health benefits and helps with healing many serious chronic diseases. Dance is a superior form of physical exercise because it also includes music and rhythm and research shows that music and dancing cover larger parts of the brain than just walking or running. Dancing…

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